News

Learn More about UVA's Memorial to Enslaved Laborers

Posted: August 27, 2019, 1:06pm

 

The Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at the University of Virginia began with a student-led effort in 2010 and is a shining example of student self-governance. The memorial will acknowledge and honor the estimated 5,000 individuals who built and maintained the University—clearing land, molding and firing bricks, transporting quarried stone, fetching water, stacking wood, scrubbing fireplaces and windows, and completing daily chores for UVA students and professors.

For more than four decades, the entire University was a site of enslavement. Now, we’re confronting our past, uncovering new knowledge, and using that knowledge to teach, heal, and shape the future.

Please consider giving to the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers here. You can also read more about the UVA's $2.5 million matching fund for the memorial here.

Ryan Forms Search Committee to Hire Next VP for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Posted: November 14, 2018, 12:00am

 

University of Virginia President Jim Ryan has established a committee to begin the search for UVA’s next vice president for diversity, equity and inclusion. Reporting to the president and serving as a member of his cabinet, the vice president works closely with senior leaders, faculty, staff, students, community members and other stakeholders to develop and execute strategies that advance UVA’s inclusive excellence. The Office for Diversity and Equity provides a place to consolidate, support, communicate and guide the University’s efforts in these areas. It also promotes a University climate and culture that incorporates cultural competency and continuous learning about the varieties of human difference. Dr. Marcus Martin, who has announced his retirement, will stay on in the position until a successor is named. (READ MORE)

Source: UVA Today (Anne E. Bromley)

Martin Luther King III Retraces His Father's Footsteps at Old Cabell Hall

Posted: November 4, 2018, 12:00am

 

On Saturday afternoon, Martin Luther King III looked out over rows of chairs in Old Cabell Hall that, 55 years ago, were filled with more than 900 University of Virginia students and faculty members listening to his father, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. King, the eldest son of the revered civil rights activist and Coretta Scott King, was in town for the premiere of “Charlottesville,” a new documentary created by UVA’s Center for Politics and Community Idea Stations about the violent white supremacist demonstrations at UVA and in Charlottesville in August 2017. He called the documentary “extremely moving,” and expressed hope that it would spur important discussions around the country.  (READ MORE)

Source: UVA Today (Caroline Newman)

UVA Professor: Transgender Characters in Media are 'Moving in Right Direction'

Posted: October 22, 2018, 12:00am

 

Transgender characters on television shows, in movies and in other mainstream media have never been more prevalent. But how do people in the transgender community feel about these characters, who are attempting to portray them? Well-represented? Empowered? More vulnerable? Better understood? Indifferent? These are questions that University of Virginia assistant media studies professor André Cavalcante addressed in his recent book, “Struggling for Ordinary: Media and Transgender Belonging in Everyday Life.” Cavalcante, who has a dual appointment in media studies and in women, gender and sexuality, interviewed hundreds of transgender people about their experiences with media throughout their lives. (READ MORE)

Source: UVA Today (Whitelaw Reid)

Historian Kevin Gaines is UVA's First Julian Bond Professor

Posted: October 18, 2018, 12:00am

 

On a bright autumn afternoon in Cleveland more than 50 years ago, 6-year-old Kevin Gaines waited for a rally at his neighborhood playground to see a visitor he already knew was important: a minister named Martin Luther King Jr. Alas, hearing the civil rights icon was not to happen that day for Gaines. King’s arrival was delayed so long that at sunset, the boy decided to head home and not be late for dinner. Today, Gaines describes himself as a product of the civil rights era. Even when very young, it was hard not to be affected, he said. His parents were “thoughtful citizens who made sure I had access to what was going on.” Gaines became a professor of African-American history. And now, after several previous posts at other prestigious universities, he has arrived at the University of Virginia as the inaugural Julian Bond Professor of Civil Rights and Social Justice. (READ MORE)

Source: UVA Today (Anne E. Bromley)

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