• Recognizing Leaders for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

    Each year, the Office for Diversity and Equity recognizes an outstanding University student, faculty, or staff member who demonstrates a dedication to leadership and the ability to create a setting in which the promotion of diversity, equity, and inclusion is paramount. 

  • Honoring Those Who Came Before Us

    The President's Commission on Slavery and the University partnered with community members to commemorate U.Va.'s African American Cemetery. (Photo credit: Sanjay Suchak)

  • During Disabling Normalcy, a disability studies symposium hosted at the University of Virginia in February 2013, panelists discuss Disability Across Disciplines: Listening, Bonnie Gordon from Music; The Presumption of Competence, Vikram Jaswal from Psychology; Tom Thumb’s America at War, Jean Franzino, Ph.D candidate from English; and Selected Poems: A Reading, Paul Guest from English – Creative Writing.

    Disabling Normalcy

    During the February 2013 disability studies symposium hosted at the University of Virginia, panelists discussed disability across disciplines.

  • A U.Va. volunteer assists a community member with registration as part of the annual Community Health Fair.

    Investing in the Health of Our Community

    Each year, the Office for Diversity and Equity works with community partners to hold the annual Community Health Fair, which provides free health screenings to members of the Charlottesville community in Washington Park.

The Office of the Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity assists and monitors all units of the University in their efforts to recruit and retain faculty, staff, and students from historically underrepresented groups and to provide affirmative and supportive environments for work and life at the University of Virginia. We commit ourselves to a vision of leadership in diversity and equity, not out of a reluctant sense of obligation but because only by enriching ourselves and embracing diversity can we become the leading institution we aspire to be.

The Office for Diversity and Equity (ODE) provides leadership, information, consultation, coordination, and assistance to the various units and constituencies within the University of Virginia in an effort to embrace diversity and equity as pillars of excellence, synergize actions at all levels of the institution, and cultivate inclusiveness and mutual respect throughout the community. We also reach beyond the University to establish beneficial relationships with individual and institutional partners who share mutual goals and interests. At the University of Virginia, we envision a community of understanding, tolerance, and respect.

 


The University of Virginia's Commitment to Diversity

Diversity stands with ethics, integrity, and academic excellence, as a cornerstone of University culture. The University promotes an inclusive and welcoming environment that embraces the full spectrum of human attributes, perspectives, and disciplines. When people of different backgrounds come together, they exchange ideas, question assumptions (including their own), and broaden the horizons for us all.  A University of Virginia community rich in diversity affords every member equal respect and provides a forum for understanding our differences as well as our commonalities.

 

 

October 16, 2018

A self-challenge posed in a tiny, sublet room last January in Brooklyn has taken a University of Virginia alumna to a place she never expected: the New York Times best-seller list. Vashti Harrison, who graduated in 2010 with a double major in media studies and studio art, moved to New York City in December 2016 to see if she could make it in the big city. Soon she was working full-time as a free-lance illustrator and finishing up drawings for a children’s book called “Festival of Colors.” In the late hours of Jan. 31, 2017, in that small room, a thought came to her: Why not draw one African-American woman every day for the month of February in honor of Black History Month? She would post her art on her Instagram account as a way to challenge herself. (READ MORE)

Source: UVA Today (Jane Kelly)

January 12, 2018

 

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 visit to the University of Virginia was the result of a small-but-determined group of students fighting an uphill battle for racial equality at a time when the nation was deeply divided. Wesley Harris, then an African-American student raised in Richmond’s Church Hill neighborhood and now a professor of aeronautics and astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was at the center of that effort. (READ MORE)

Source: UVA Today (Jane Kelly)

Diversity Dashboard

The Diversity Dashboard provides data on the composition of U.Va.’s faculty, staff, and students.

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